Invasion Colchester 2017

INVASION COLCHESTER Returns...

SATURDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 2017 · 10.00AM - 3.30PM

THROUGHOUT COLCHESTER TOWN CENTRE

STAR CARS · SPECIAL GUESTS · LIVE MUSIC & ENTERTAINMENT · CHARACTER HUNT · FANCY DRESS COMPETITION · REFRESHMENTS

Thank YOU!

Thanks to the incredible efforts of everyone involved
and the generous contributions from everyone who donated
we managed to raise just over...

£9000

for our chosen charities!

Why we're raising money...

St Helena Hospice

St Helena Hospice

(Registered Charity No. 280919)

St Helena Hospice exists to meet the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of people with life-limiting illness, no matter what their diagnosis. They are here to support families, including children, before and after bereavement and to support people from every background and faith who need their services.

They are a registered charity providing specialist and holistic care for anyone living in North Essex and parts of Mid Essex who have been diagnosed with a life-limiting illness. All services are free of charge to patients and their families and delivered by the highly qualified teams of specialists including nurses, doctors, physio and occupational therapists, social workers, complementary therapists, counsellors and a chaplaincy team at any stage of the illness.

These services are provided through their Inpatient Unit in Colchester and two Day Centres based in Colchester and Clacton, as well as in people's own homes through the Hospice Nurse Specialist team and Hospice at Home service.

The Hospice also has a specialist Education Centre, an approved collaborative partner of Anglia Ruskin University, promoting skilled and compassionate palliative care through training and education up to Masters Degree level.

St Helena Hospice Inpatient Unit is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Visit the St Helena Hospice website

Charities: CoHoC

Colchester Hospitals Charity

(Registered Charity No. 1051504)

CoHoC helps Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust (the Trust) do more for the patients cared for by the Trust's staff. There's often a new piece of equipment, more up-to-date technologies, and newer fixtures and fittings that will improve the patients' environment. It's these extras - some small, some large - which are above and beyond the scope of the NHS budget, that really make a difference to patients, and the care that the staff can deliver.

Colchester Hospitals Charity is one of more than 400 registered charities in the UK associated with NHS Trusts. Together these charities contribute £400 million each year to their hospitals. Their aim is not to fund patient care but to enhance and improve it - providing grants to projects and that are over and above those served by government funding.

The Trust prides itself on giving 21st century healthcare for a 21st century population. It provides services to the 370,000 people of north east Essex and cancer services to a further 300,000 people in mid Essex. The Trust's services are available at Colchester General Hospital and Essex County Hospital as well as clinics at the community hospitals in Clacton, Harwich and Halstead. In 2009/2010 the hospitals dealt with 381,414 Outpatient attendances, 72,354 Accident and Emergency patients, 77,274 Inpatient and day case admissions and delivered 3,947 babies!

Donations are spent exactly where they were intended to be spent and put to the best possible use. CoHoC is made up of over 80 funds that encompass all areas of the Trust.

Visit the CoHoC website

How it came to be...

Simon Leonard (Invasion Colchester Founder)

"I launched Invasion Colchester in 2011 as a way to raise money for a very important cause which saved my life...

On the 9 January 2011 I was admitted to Colchester University Hospital with breathing difficulties. Within two days I was on life support due to a complete failure of my lungs and following tests, I was diagnosed with swine flu (H1N1).

On the 14 January my family were informed that there was nothing else that could be done for me and to expect the worst. The only treatment for my condition was called ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation). This is a process intended for patients whose heart and lungs cannot function normally on their own. Basically, the machine removed blood from my body, then oxygenated and heated it before pumping it back since my lungs were unable to produce any oxygen at all. The ECMO machine can, for up to several weeks, act as an artificial heart and lung. There are very few beds in ECMO Units in the country but I was lucky; later that day a bed became available in Leicester Glenfield Hospital and I was transferred that evening by a specialist team and ambulance.

I remained on the ECMO machine for 12 days during which time I required twenty four hour care from two specialist nurses. I was eventually transferred back to Colchester to continue my recovery at home.

I owe my life to the machine and the specialists that nursed me both in Colchester and Leicester for which I and my family are eternally grateful. I was the fortunate individual out of twenty people requiring the one bed that became available that night and I wanted to show my whole-hearted gratitude by raising funds and awareness for ECMO. There are very few machines available with the specialists required to operate them in this country and I am still hoping to be able to play a small part in rectifying this situation.

Due to the substantial success of the orginal event, a decision was made there and then to continue Invasion Colchester every year, for as long as we can, raising money for additional charities in the process.

So this September please show your support for our very worthy causes, head into town for the day and help us raise some much needed funds. It's going to be a blast!"

- Simon Leonard (Invasion Colchester Founder)